https://i0.wp.com/captainsforcleanwater.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Branden-Franklin-Thumbnail-1.png?resize=1280%2C720&ssl=1

Together as an industry—manufacturers, fishing guides, ambassadors, tournament fishermen, recreational anglers—it’s important that we are a voice for our water quality and don’t let it slip as a priority. After 15 years with Power-Pole, Branden Franklin affirms it’s a mindset that must be intentionally passed on to each generation. About Power-Pole With the unmatched versatility...

https://i2.wp.com/captainsforcleanwater.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/C5A2542-2.jpg?resize=1280%2C720&ssl=1

Published by TCPalm, May 6, 2020 By Cheryl Smith There’s a new battle brewing in the ongoing fight over Lake Okeechobee’s water level. Everglades area farmers, burgeoning South Florida communities and the Miccosukee tribe are among those who want to keep the lake high in the dry season, essentially creating a reservoir to meet their ever-increasing water demands....

https://i1.wp.com/captainsforcleanwater.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/JS_131123_0373.jpg?resize=1280%2C720&ssl=1

In times of crisis, we as outdoorsmen and women, often take to nature to escape, reflect, and stay grounded. It provides sanctuary in times of need. For many people, it supports their livelihood, pays their bills, and feeds their family. As we face the global Coronavirus pandemic, Florida is seeing widespread closures to mitigate the...

https://i0.wp.com/captainsforcleanwater.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/CF2A8008-scaled-1.jpg?resize=1280%2C720&ssl=1

Over the greater part of a century, the Everglades was systematically drained by man as a means of progress and development. The fragile wilderness was slowly decimated, leaving unintended consequences: degrading water quality, loss of habitat and native species, and severe economic impact.   Once it was realized that Florida’s economy and water quality depend...

https://i2.wp.com/captainsforcleanwater.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/GGillett-LowRes-FlBay-10-of-49-800x533-1.jpg?resize=800%2C533&ssl=1

  At the southernmost tip of the Florida peninsula, there’s an unassuming map dot that marks a place called, Flamingo. To get there, you must enter the gates of Everglades National Park, then drive for an hour more, carving through an endless expanse of marsh, cypress heads, and dwarf-pine prairies. Don’t bother mapping it from...